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February 4, 1940 Life in Camp

Aldershot, N.S. Feb 4, 1940 Dear Annilea: At the present moment Nelson Eddie is singing: “Rose Marie” & how beautiful a song it really is. Darling! If he had you to sing about, as I have, he’d have something to really sing about then. Had the Company all to myself to-day and for the remainder of the week so I’ll be plenty busy. Thursday night the whole Company is going to spend out in the woods, build shelters, fires etc eat & sleep there. Should be good fun but I sure hope this cold weather lets up a little. The Colonel put the rink out of bounds to all officers & N.C.O.’s to-day. It seems that a bunch of the boys got drunk Saturday night & one of them ordered an officer out of the rink; Hence we suffer. And they say the Officers have an easy time of it. Glad you think so, because I don’t. Of course, there is one officer over here that is lucky enough to know that behind it all he has the most wonderful creature at home, willing & waiting at all times to give her full love to him. When I get the least bit dull you are the one memory that can pull me out of it. “I mean that with all my heart.” This included heart is only a speck of what my heart really feels for you & with these thoughts I leave you. I hope that you will be “My Valentine.” Love in Snow Banks, Arnold

(note to reader: added a few days later in the same envelope) Page 5/

Hello Darling,

I am back again, very tardy I’ll admit, but here nonetheless. I’ve been busy & the work that I’ve been doing has been very taxing; for instance: Thursday night we went on a scheme with full pack, that means about 60 lbs on your back & if you don’t think that’s heavy weigh 60 lbs out sometime, in bulk, & find out for yourself. We left at 8 O’clock & from the time we left we were plowing knee deep through snow for about 21/2 miles, then we stopped & dug in which means we had to dig three to four feet into the ground, half the company having shovels & half picks. We had to keep guard & place pickets against imaginary enemies. Later, after being inspected by our Major, we marched back to camp by the road 3 miles. When we hit the parade ground & I formed them up to dismiss them, one of the boys fainted & two others were out on there feet. (1:30 in the morning). To show that it could be done & to set an example I kept my own pack on until 2:40 when I got to my room. During that time I fed my troops & put them to bed making sure that there were no sore feet. All through the week its been the same so that by the time I’ve gotten in I’ve been quite willing to go to bed. Last night I went to a dance in Acadia; tonight I am on duty, Battalion Orderly Officer. Darling! Just because I haven’t written lately doesn’t mean that I love you any the less I’ve just been too tired. Thanks sweet for all your letter’s. Just a few lines give me the best thrill that a man can receive. From now on I’ll try to do better myself even if just a few lines. My Love for you lives and grows ever day, take hold that sacred love of ours until we meet again. All my Love thrown(?) to you Darling, Arnold



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Aldershot, N.S. Dear Annilea: Just another hot day. Over there you actually don’t know what heat is. No wind, no nothing. A blazing hot sun on sand, like a desert & as if that wasn’t enough , no water